Posts tagged ALEC

The pattern is simple but takes place over a long period of time: shift tax burden, create deficit, blame government, defund government, repeat.
House Speaker Ray Merrick, a Stilwell Republican, and Senate President Susan Wagle, a Wichita Republican, are members of ALEC’s board.

—Democrat, allies worried about climate change to push energy policies; key GOP senator wary

Now you know who is calling the shots in the Kansas legislature. These people will have you live in a Kansas that could go as dry as a desert and has tornadoes that will drop you off far beyond The Yellow Brick Road or The Emerald City.

Help Defund ALEC's Right Wing Agenda - People For the American Way

The Petition:

Dear President/CEO and Board,

Your company funds or participates in the activities of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), a group whose ideologically driven agenda has led to the reckless promotion of bills that harm consumers, endanger individuals and deny the fundamental, constitutional rights of millions.

ALEC pushes discriminatory voter ID legislation that suppresses the votes of minorities, young voters, low-income voters and the elderly by erecting barriers that could disenfranchise millions of voters across the nation. Bills based on ALEC’s model legislation in this area have been introduced in numerous states. Although proponents of voter ID laws claim the goal is to reduce voter fraud, there is no evidence that such fraud occurs with any regularity in this country.

Further, ALEC has worked with the NRA to aggressively spread passage of laws like the Florida so-called “Stand Your Ground” law which was implicated in the tragic shooting of Trayvon Martin. Such laws, more aptly named Shoot First laws, encourage vigilantism that endangers whole communities.

I strongly urge you to withdraw from and cease supporting ALEC and its agenda. I am part of a growing number of Americans who are concerned about the role that ALEC is playing in the promotion and passage of laws that do real harm to individual Americans and will be taking note of which companies continue to support ALEC’s efforts.

Please do the right thing, and separate yourself from ALEC’s extreme political, and reckless, agenda.

Tell Google CEO Larry Page to Cut Ties with ALEC

Next week, Google will be joining Koch Industries, ExxonMobil and a passel of other fossil fuel barons at ALEC’s annual meeting in Washington, DC, where bills to “tax the sun” and limit the EPA’s regulation of greenhouse gases will be on the table.

What happened to “don’t be evil?”

"Yelp is…" evil

jacquesofalltrades:

hman:

Yelp is a portmanteau of “Yellow Pages.””

Learn something new everyday.

Which reminds me, I should put up
some new Yelp reviews… it’s been a while.

On the contrary, there are several good reasons to abandon Yelp.

ALEC’s Latest Trojan Horse: The Attack on Standards and Safeguards Moves to the States | Center for Effective Government

States should be on the lookout for these proposals and oppose any regulatory process changes designed to delay, weaken, or block important agency actions. Where existing regulatory analyses and review requirements already impede state agencies’ ability to promptly issue and update standards, states should consider reforms that would address issues of delay, political and special interest interference, and inadequate transparency in the regulatory process. These positive policy changes could include:

  • Curbing undue political interference in rulemaking
    States should ensure that members of regulatory review bodies or committees disclose any conflicts of interest.

  • Limiting the agency actions that are subject to centralized regulatory review
    Review bodies have struggled to keep up with requirements to review all rules. Even if the review body has the discretion to select the rules it will review, there may be a tendency to assert review authority over a wide range of agency actions. Narrowing the scope of the review body’s authority can help conserve scarce resources.

  • Ensuring that centralized regulatory review does not result in unnecessary delay
    It is important that state agencies be allowed to move forward with rules without being subject to unnecessary and excessive reviews. States could prescribe time limits on reviews to prevent a centralized review body from holding up agency actions.

  • Reducing reliance on cost-benefit analysis
    Where agencies are required to conduct or rely on cost-benefit analyses, those analyses should only be informative, not determinative. States should acknowledge the limitations of cost-benefit analysis and the importance of considering qualitative factors in decision making. States should also explicitly endorse deference to the regulatory determinations of expert agencies.

  • Increasing transparency in the regulatory review process
    Transparency can ensure accountability in the review process. The public should be informed of regulatory delays and any changes that are made to an agency’s rule or analysis during review. States should require review bodies and agencies to document these changes, as well as any communications they have with outside parties concerning the rule’s cost-benefit analysis or substance.
Google and other tech giants have reportedly teamed up with the pro-corporate ALEC to draft model legislation on technology issues. This puts Google in bed with an outfit infamous for crafting “stand-your-ground,” voter ID and other right-wing bills that are then pushed through state legislatures….

Google’s Dark Alliance with ALEC | Consortiumnews

It’s consistent for a corporation that has turned it’s back on it’s earliest motto, Don’t Be Evil.

We continue our series looking into ALEC, the American legislative exchange Council, as they celebrate their 40th anniversary in Chicago. Six people were arrested Monday when protesters descended upon the Palmer House Hilton in Chicago to push back against the impending visit of ALEC.

Now joining us to talk more about the protest and the history of ALEC and its influence on public education around the country are two guests. We are joined by Julie Mead. She’s a professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. She researches, teaches, and writes about topics related to legal aspects of education. Her research centers on legal issues related to special education and raised by forms of school choice.

Two watchdog groups are asking the Internal Revenue Service and several state ethics committees to investigate ALEC for funneling corporate money through an ALEC slush fund to allow wealthy corporations to take a federal tax deduction for furnishing lawmakers and their families with luxurious trips at fancy resorts. One such meeting is the upcoming ALEC conference this week to celebrate the anti-democracy group’s 40th year of assisting the richest corporations to write and pass legislation beneficial to their privatization efforts and profits. The watchdogs’ complaints also charge that ALEC conceals the sources of “slush funds” from public view and obscures the amount of spending from the IRS by claiming that it holds the corporate funds in “trust,” all the while writing lawmakers’ checks to cover their trips.

The so-called “scholarship fund” ALEC uses to fund the lavish trips also raises serious questions about the corporate group’s compliance with state gift and disclosure laws that in turn brings into question the lawmakers’ ethics in accepting ALEC’s travel gifts and precipitated the watchdog’s letters to state ethics committees. In question is whether Republican state legislators taking the fancy trips (bribes) disclosed the gifts on their state financial disclosures, or if they noted they originated from corporate donors seeking favorable votes on ALEC template legislation.
States around the country, including Texas, Ohio, Missouri and North Carolina are poised to cut back on government support for clean energy jobs using model legislation from the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). ALEC, which brings companies together with state lawmakers to forge a wish list of corporate state laws behind closed doors, is coordinating this year’s assault on state laws that require a gradual increase of electricity generated by clean energy sources.
ALEC and a hoard of other Koch-funded interests operating under the umbrella of the State Policy Network have hit Kansas legislators hard with junk economic studies, junk science and a junk vision of more polluting energy in Kansas’ future. Koch Industries lobbyist Jonathan Small has added direct pressure on Kansas lawmakers to rollback support for clean energy.

States around the country, including Texas, Ohio, Missouri and North Carolina are poised to cut back on government support for clean energy jobs using model legislation from the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). ALEC, which brings companies together with state lawmakers to forge a wish list of corporate state laws behind closed doors, is coordinating this year’s assault on state laws that require a gradual increase of electricity generated by clean energy sources.

ALEC and a hoard of other Koch-funded interests operating under the umbrella of the State Policy Network have hit Kansas legislators hard with junk economic studies, junk science and a junk vision of more polluting energy in Kansas’ future. Koch Industries lobbyist Jonathan Small has added direct pressure on Kansas lawmakers to rollback support for clean energy.