Posts tagged Latino

Seriously, Ms. Dumanis, do you take me for a fool? I’ve been following enough of what you have done in office to know that your endorsement doesn’t mean much.
Want to talk about bullying? OK, let’s talk about your prosecution of chronically (sic) ill people who are smoking a dried plant for relief of the symptoms those illnesses. Talking about snatching low hanging fruit…picking on sick people…tsk tsk. You were ineffectual representing your constituents against predatory banking practices, leaving them on the street. But neither issue killed people outright.
On the other hand, your efforts to keep prisons and jails filled to the brim along with your support of capital punishment is a cynical way to build your career. I’ll say it again: the body of one condemned by law makes a great mortar to build a politician’s career; you get a second place ribbon for locking up as many as you can. It doesn’t matter what color their skin is.
It’s bad for all people of color every where when they deal with law enforcement - there isn’t much motivation for you to protect the human rights and civil rights of people of color in San Diego County. That’s particularly true for Latinos because when they end up dead due to the actions of law enforcement officers acting under the guise of duty, you do nothing to prosecute their deaths. Maybe you should go walk down North Santa Fe Avenue in Vista or Washington Avenue in El Cajon or Beyer Blvd. in San Ysidro and ask people you’re pretty sure are Latino if they’ve learned their lesson for being an bad constituency, not cooperating with your office and agents to keep law-and-order in the barrios.
Ms. Dumanis, you are an authority on bullying. You know something about running for office in San Diego, that a man never treats a woman disrespectfully and should expect to win a high profile race; we can both point at Peter Navarro as an example. The difference between you and Bob Filner is that when you do it, people end up behind bars or they end up dead. That being said, find a nice, dark place to stick your hypocritical accusations. Stop pretending that your constituents don’t filter out the cynicism and/or hypocrisy from anything that comes out of your mouth or you have attributed to you in print.

Seriously, Ms. Dumanis, do you take me for a fool? I’ve been following enough of what you have done in office to know that your endorsement doesn’t mean much.

Want to talk about bullying? OK, let’s talk about your prosecution of chronically (sic) ill people who are smoking a dried plant for relief of the symptoms those illnesses. Talking about snatching low hanging fruit…picking on sick people…tsk tsk. You were ineffectual representing your constituents against predatory banking practices, leaving them on the street. But neither issue killed people outright.

On the other hand, your efforts to keep prisons and jails filled to the brim along with your support of capital punishment is a cynical way to build your career. I’ll say it again: the body of one condemned by law makes a great mortar to build a politician’s career; you get a second place ribbon for locking up as many as you can. It doesn’t matter what color their skin is.

It’s bad for all people of color every where when they deal with law enforcement - there isn’t much motivation for you to protect the human rights and civil rights of people of color in San Diego County. That’s particularly true for Latinos because when they end up dead due to the actions of law enforcement officers acting under the guise of duty, you do nothing to prosecute their deaths. Maybe you should go walk down North Santa Fe Avenue in Vista or Washington Avenue in El Cajon or Beyer Blvd. in San Ysidro and ask people you’re pretty sure are Latino if they’ve learned their lesson for being an bad constituency, not cooperating with your office and agents to keep law-and-order in the barrios.

Ms. Dumanis, you are an authority on bullying. You know something about running for office in San Diego, that a man never treats a woman disrespectfully and should expect to win a high profile race; we can both point at Peter Navarro as an example. The difference between you and Bob Filner is that when you do it, people end up behind bars or they end up dead. That being said, find a nice, dark place to stick your hypocritical accusations. Stop pretending that your constituents don’t filter out the cynicism and/or hypocrisy from anything that comes out of your mouth or you have attributed to you in print.

Today is The Last day for the California Assembly to vote for bill to end shameful legacy of racism for farmworkers.

As we get ready to celebrate Labor Day weekend, please remember that some workers are still not entitled to the 8 hour work day that many of us take for granted. Today is the last day for your Assemblymember to vote in favor of this bill that will give farm workers the same overtime after an 8 hour work day as any other worker. Please e-mail your assemblymember NOW and ask them to support this bill.

It has been 74 years since farm workers and domestic workers were left out of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act, the landmark federal law setting minimum wages and overtime for nearly all American workers.

To win votes from Southern lawmakers back in 1938, President Franklin D. Roosevelt was forced to exempt farm and domestic workers. Nearly all of those workers in the Southern U.S. then were African Americans. Today in California and across the country, most farm workers are Latinos.

The United Farm Workers is sponsoring AB 1313, by Assemblymember Michael Allen (D-Santa Rosa), to provide overtime pay for farm workers after eight hours a day or 40 hours a week. This bill passed the state Senate and is now on the Assembly floor. Today at midnight is the deadline to vote for the bill and send it to CA Gov. Jerry Brown. Can you please your Assemblymember an email today asking him/her to sign this vital bill?

The exclusion of farm workers from overtime after eight hours was wrong in 1938. It is wrong now. The time has come for it to end. California provides 80 percent of the nation’s fresh produce and as a result its agricultural laws set the standard for the nation. Tell your Assemblymember to end this shameful legacy of racism in California by voting in favor of AB 1313.

Moreno has been the victim of several travesties at the hands of government. While his girlfriend was the one who was actually asasulted and thus bears the vast majority of the resulting trauma herself, the secondary trauma of watching another person, especially one who you deeply care about, be sexually assaulted is also very real and not to be dismissed. While the impact that the assault undoubtedly had on Moreno is not the reason that the assault was wrong, it is one of the outcomes of it. After Moreno’s girlfriend faced the trauma of being sexually assaulted and Moreno faced the trauma of watching it happen, both then were subjected to false arrest by the assailant. And now, Moreno must undergo further victimization at the hands of a government that sees fit to deport him (and his girlfriend faces the secondary victimization of watching it happen while she deals with her own trauma from the assault).

This case is about how we treat sexual assault because Moreno’s girlfriend never should have been assaulted, and Moreno never should have had to call for help at all. As has been admitted, Marcus Jackson should have never been admitted to the police force, due to a history of giving women reason to fear him. It’s about how we treat sexual assault because most who are victims of sexual assault are too afraid to report it. It’s about how we treat sexual assault because fear of police and the (repeatedly proven to be!) reasonable belief that police officers will usually stand by each other before standing by justice means that police officers feel free to both commit sexual assault with impunity and use their state power as a means to hiding their crimes. It’s about how we treat sexual assault because apparently not even 911 operators can be expected to give a shit when such an assault is reported.

Why is MALDEF Honoring Walmart?

The other day I received an invitation from the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF) for its annual fundraising dinner in Los Angeles.  But what struck my eye was the icon in the middle of the invitation: “Walmart: Gala Chair.”

Let’s be clear what it means to be a gala chair: it’s essentially something of an honor in exchange for a contribution.  For Walmart, it means that they get the public relations benefits of being a MALDEF supporter; MALDEF, of course, gets the check.  All of this is good and mutually beneficial.

Except that, as is well known, Walmart has one of themost egregious employment records of any large American company.  It underpays its workers, and sometimes doesn’t even pay them at all.  As Harold Meyerson documented in a superb article last year, Walmart helps run a collection of warehouses where the workers suffer in terrible conditions.  Oh, and most of those workers are Latino.

Every nonprofit has to deal with a fundamental problem: advancing the organization’s mission and preserving the organization itself do not always dovetail.  Compromises have to be made.  When I was a board president of a legal service organization in East Los Angeles, we received decent-sized grant from Altria, the new name of Philip Morris.  No one likes tobacco companies, but if we didn’t take the grant, we would have been forced to lay off two lawyers and close down an effective program.  We took the money.

But this is different.  It’s one think to take some money: it’s quite another to honor the organization and place it high in your promotional materials.  And Walmart isn’t just another company: it’s the world’s largest retailer, with gross receipts in excess of many countries’ GDP, which is at the heart of an American business structure actively seeking to undermine workers’ rights and eviscerate middle class jobs.  This is a compromise too far.  It attacks the very constituencies that MALDEF claims to be working for.

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…cannot be unread

The goal of the march, according to UFW president Arturo Rodriguez, is to raise awareness for farm worker issues and gain the support needed from Gov. Jerry Brown and the State Legislature to make much needed changes.

“It’s important for (Gov. Brown) to do what the farm workers are expecting him to do — respond to our needs. Do what’s necessary, make the changes. Do what’s right for farm workers,” Rodriguez said.

The top issues the UFW want Sacramento to face: the Fair Treatment for Farm Workers Act and the right to be paid overtime after eight hours a day and 40 hours a week.

In June Brown vetoed the Fair Treatment for Farm Workers Act, a bill that would have made it easier for farm workers to join a union and speak up for their rights; and farm workers are currently exempt from federal overtime labor laws.

“We needn’t give up just because he vetoed that law,” said Jose Cerritos, 23, one of the six Salinas-area farm workers who joined the march on Friday. “We must continue to fight, even harder.”

Farm workers march through town, rally for change

Governor, do you actually think that you’ve gained favor with a group of people who still call you Governor Moonbeam behind your back by vetoing that bill?

San Joaquin Valley Latinos Exposed to Nitrates

Researchers found that across all eight counties studied, there was a positive correlation between water systems that served larger proportions of Latinos and increased nitrate levels in the water systems, and that Latinos in the San Joaquin Valley are disproportionately exposed to higher levels of nitrates in drinking water. In addition, researchers found that this relationship is strongest in smaller water systems.

What can exposure to nitrates do to human beings?

High nitrate levels in drinking water pose a health risk to infants because they may cause methemologlobinemia, a condition known as “blue baby syndrome.”

High nitrate levels interrupt the normal body processes of some infants. Nitrate becomes toxic when it is reduced to nitrite, a process that can occur in the stomach as well as in the saliva. Infants are especially susceptible because their stomach juices are less acidic and therefore are conducive to the growth of nitrate-reducing bacteria. (Adults can consume large quantities of nitrates in drinking water or food with no known ill effects; their stomachs produce strong acids that do not promote the growth of bacteria that convert nitrate to nitrite.) Nitrite in the blood combines with hemoglobin to form methemoglobin, which reduces the capability of the blood to carry oxygen to all parts of the body. This results in the “blue” condition of the baby’s skin.

What bigots should take away from this is that sub-humans are not born, they are made from the garbage they grow up in.

Hispanics emerge as key 2012 wild card -Politico

This article misses a couple of variables:

The Latino vote just might not show up for Obama no matter what he would like in a couple years.

¿porque no participan en nuestra comundad?

Es su futuro, tambien. Si no votan, no tiene derecho de quejarse.

Remembering Cesar Chavez

…looks like the grape boycott never ended