Posts tagged environment

Urge the EPA to Save Bees

Native pollinators like bees play an essential role in the environment and are an indispensable part of our agricultural system. Many foods that we eat depend on crops pollinated by honeybees and 90% of all flowering plants require pollinators to reproduce. But in recent years, bees and other pollinators have been disappearing at alarming rates, causing widespread concern that these important species could be wiped out altogether.

A widely used class of insecticides called neonicotinoids affects pollinators including honeybees. Since neonicotinoids first became widely used in the mid-2000s, roughly one-third of America’s honeybee colonies have collapsed each year. Allowing even one more of these insecticides to be used on farms and orchards will only make the situation worse.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently approved a new insecticide called sulfoxaflor even though their own scientists considered the product to be similar to neonicotinoids and “very highly toxic” to honeybees. We need to ensure that this insecticide, and others like it, does not get out into the environment. We cannot afford a collapse in pollinator populations.

Urge the EPA to refuse to approve any insecticides unless scientists confirm they present no threat to bees and other pollinators.

Sign the petition: Pass SB 1132 California Fracking Moratorium

I signed a petition to The California State House and The California State Senate which says: "Tell California State Legislators to support a fracking moratorium now and vote yes on SB 1132.”

Will you sign this petition?

Today’s decision makes Indiana the first state in the nation to roll back its energy savings goals. While we are very disappointed with the governor’s decision to allow SEA340 to become law, it is critical that Governor Pence and the Indiana General Assembly now follow through on their promise of creating an improved energy efficiency program for Indiana. Energizing Indiana has saved millions of dollars, created hundreds of jobs, reduced energy costs and made Indiana homes and businesses warmer and more energy efficient. There’s no denying that hundreds of energy efficiency workers will be out of a job next January when utilities cancel or scale back home energy audits, appliance rebates and low-income home weatherization programs. We will now work with our coalition partners to make sure Indiana electric utilities will be required to replace what they’ve destroyed, despite their historic failure to reduce energy demand for the benefit of their customers.

Sierra Club Statement on Pence Decision To Allow Senate Bill 340 To Become Law | Sierra Club National

I remember when Mike Pence was in congress and what a smug bastard he seemed like then. This action is petty and reactionary; it serves no real purpose other than to run up the meters of Indiana utility consumers thus giving another coat of lining to the pockets of energy utilities.


It was never just about Asheville’s water. Or now Greenville’s. Little Timmy Moffitt and his overlords from ALEC are determined to wrest control of all water resources from the people who depend on them, so that a small group of future water tyrants can squeeze profits from the parched mouths of citizens peasants.

 (via ALEC-inspired water conquest going statewide? | BlueNC)

It was never just about Asheville’s water. Or now Greenville’s. Little Timmy Moffitt and his overlords from ALEC are determined to wrest control of all water resources from the people who depend on them, so that a small group of future water tyrants can squeeze profits from the parched mouths of citizens peasants.


On April 4, 2012 the FBI held a daylong “strategy meeting” with TransCanada Corporation, the company building the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, according to documents obtained by Earth Island Journal through a Freedom of Information Act request. The meeting, which took place in the agency’s Oklahoma City Field Office, came just three weeks after President Barack Obama visited the state vowing to cut through bureaucratic red tape and approve the southern portion of the pipeline. In a speech at a TransCanada pipe yard in Cushing, Oklahoma on March 22 Obama said: “Today, we’re making this new pipeline from Cushing to the Gulf a priority. So the southern leg of it we’re making a priority, and we’re going to go ahead and get that done.”
A new study has underscored just how little is known about the health consequences of the natural gas boom that began a decade ago, when advances in high-volume hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, and directional drilling allowed companies to tap shale deposits across the United States.

"Despite broad public concern, no comprehensive population-based studies of the public health effects of [unconventional natural gas] operations exist," concluded the report published Monday in the peer-reviewed journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Last week, The Center for Public Integrity, InsideClimate News and The Weather Channel reported on the health data gap in the Eagle Ford Shale, where a lack of air monitoring and research is aggravated by a Texas regulatory system that often protects the gas and oil industry over the public.

 (via SAY NO TO PALM OIL - Seenox)Due to the massive international demand for palm oil, palm oil plantations are rapidly replacing the rainforest habitat of the critically endangered orangutan; with over 90% of their habitat already destroyed in the last 20 years.Orangutans are some of our closest relatives, sharing approximately 97% of their DNA with humans. Orangutan means ‘Person of the jungle’ in the Indonesian language. It is estimated that 6 to 12 of these ‘jungle people’ are killed each day for palm oil. These gentle creatures are either killed in the deforestation process, when they wonder into a palm oil plantation looking for food, or in the illegal pet trade after they’ve been captured and kept as pets in extremely poor conditions and provided with extremely poor nutrition.Orangutans are considered as pests by the palm oil industry. In the deforestation process, workers are told that if wildlife gets in the way, they are to do whatever is necessary in order to dispose them, no matter how inhumane. Often orangutans are run over by logging machinery, beat to death, buried alive or set on fire… all in the name of palm oil.Government data has shown that over 50,000 orangutans have already died as a result of deforestation due to palm oil in the last two decades. Experts say that if this pattern of destruction and exploitation continues, these intelligent acrobats of the jungle will be extinct in the wild within 3 to 12 years (as early as 2015). It is also thought that their jungle habitat will be completely gone within 20 years (approximately 2033).Around 50 million tons of palm oil is produced annually; with almost all of that being non-sustainable palm oil, that replaces 12 million hectares of dense, bio-diverse rainforest. That’s the equivalent landmass of North Korea deforested each year for palm oil alone!Palm oil is also having a shocking impact on our planet. The production of this one vegetable oil is not only responsible for polluting rivers and causing land erosion, but when the plantation workers set fire to the remaining trees, shrubs and debris to make way for the oil palms, it produces immense amount of smoke pollution that is toxic to planet earth. This has been found to be the second biggest contributor to greenhouse gas in the world.By purchasing products that contain crude palm oil, you are helping destroy ancient, pristine rainforest, wipe out species like the orangutan, and create a large-scale ecological disaster. Think of the consequences next time you do your weekly shopping; the consequences not only for orangutans and other animals, but for us as the human race; for we cannot survive without the rainforests either. We have a choice, orangutans do not.

Due to the massive international demand for palm oil, palm oil plantations are rapidly replacing the rainforest habitat of the critically endangered orangutan; with over 90% of their habitat already destroyed in the last 20 years.

Orangutans are some of our closest relatives, sharing approximately 97% of their DNA with humans. Orangutan means ‘Person of the jungle’ in the Indonesian language. It is estimated that 6 to 12 of these ‘jungle people’ are killed each day for palm oil. These gentle creatures are either killed in the deforestation process, when they wonder into a palm oil plantation looking for food, or in the illegal pet trade after they’ve been captured and kept as pets in extremely poor conditions and provided with extremely poor nutrition.

Orangutans are considered as pests by the palm oil industry. In the deforestation process, workers are told that if wildlife gets in the way, they are to do whatever is necessary in order to dispose them, no matter how inhumane. Often orangutans are run over by logging machinery, beat to death, buried alive or set on fire… all in the name of palm oil.

Government data has shown that over 50,000 orangutans have already died as a result of deforestation due to palm oil in the last two decades. Experts say that if this pattern of destruction and exploitation continues, these intelligent acrobats of the jungle will be extinct in the wild within 3 to 12 years (as early as 2015). It is also thought that their jungle habitat will be completely gone within 20 years (approximately 2033).

Around 50 million tons of palm oil is produced annually; with almost all of that being non-sustainable palm oil, that replaces 12 million hectares of dense, bio-diverse rainforest. That’s the equivalent landmass of North Korea deforested each year for palm oil alone!

Palm oil is also having a shocking impact on our planet. The production of this one vegetable oil is not only responsible for polluting rivers and causing land erosion, but when the plantation workers set fire to the remaining trees, shrubs and debris to make way for the oil palms, it produces immense amount of smoke pollution that is toxic to planet earth. This has been found to be the second biggest contributor to greenhouse gas in the world.

By purchasing products that contain crude palm oil, you are helping destroy ancient, pristine rainforest, wipe out species like the orangutan, and create a large-scale ecological disaster. Think of the consequences next time you do your weekly shopping; the consequences not only for orangutans and other animals, but for us as the human race; for we cannot survive without the rainforests either. We have a choice, orangutans do not.

This closure is in response to a significant increase in wood poaching crimes occurring along the parkway. These crimes usually
involve cutting burl and bunion growths from both standing and fallen old-growth redwood trees. The wood is then sold for construction materials, ornamental furniture, and souvenirs. This type of wood is becoming increasingly rare and the most plentiful supply is often found on park lands.
I did ask the president when we could anticipate a decision on the Keystone pipeline,” said Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin, a Republican, the association’s chairwoman. “Finally, he did come back and say that he anticipates an answer one way or the other in a couple of months.