Posts tagged internet

Dianne Feinstein Accidentally Confirms That NSA Tapped The Internet Backbone | Techdirt

However, as Kevin Bankston notes, during Thursday’s Senate Intelligence Committee hearing, Dianne Feinstein more or less admitted that they get emails via “upstream” collection methods. As you can see in the following clip, Feinstein interrupts a discussion to read a prepared “rebuttal” to a point being made, and in doing so clearly says that the NSA can get emails via upstream collections:

Upstream collection… occurs when NSA obtains internet communications, such as e-mails, from certain US companies that operate the Internet background, i.e., the companies that own and operate the domestic telecommunications lines over which internet traffic flows.
She clearly means “backbone” rather than “background.” She’s discussing this in an attempt to defend the NSA’s “accidental” collection of information it shouldn’t have had. But that point is not that important. Instead, the important point is that she’s now admitted what most people suspected, but which the administration has totally avoided admitting for many, many years since the revelations made by Mark Klein.

So, despite years of trying to deny that the NSA can collect email and other communications directly from the backbone (rather than from the internet companies themselves), Feinstein appears to have finally let the cat out of the bag, perhaps without realizing it.

Maybe you’re looking at a system error. But I doubt that.

Look at how chintzy FB is now - they will prevent you from sending your e-mail address in a message. Just to try and keep you hooked make you work another way around it. Never mind charging you a dollar to send a message to a stranger, now they won’t let you talk to your friends there. Facebook thinks that you won’t find a work around, but it is offensive to be treated like an idiot like this.

If anyone from Facebook cares to comment or correct me and confirm that they do allow people to send e-mail addresses in personal messages, you have 45 days from the date of publication of this post to do it; just add a Disqus comment.

Two different versions of the PRISM scandal were emerging on Thursday with Silicon Valley executives denying all knowledge of the top secret program that gives the National Security Agency direct access to the internet giants’ servers.

The eavesdropping program is detailed in the form of PowerPoint slides in a leaked NSA document, seen and authenticated by the Guardian, which states that it is based on “legally-compelled collection” but operates with the “assistance of communications providers in the US.”

Each of the 41 slides in the document displays prominently the corporate logos of the tech companies claimed to be taking part in PRISM.

However, senior executives from the internet companies expressed surprise and shock and insisted that no direct access to servers had been offered to any government agency.

The top-secret NSA briefing presentation set out details of the PRISM program, which it said granted access to records such as emails, chat conversations, voice calls, documents and more. The presentation the listed dates when document collection began for each company, and said PRISM enabled “direct access from the servers of these US service providers: Microsoft, Yahoo, Google, Facebook, Paltalk, AOL, Skype, YouTube, Apple”.

Senior officials with knowledge of the situation within the tech giants admitted to being confused by the NSA revelations, and said if such data collection was taking place, it was without companies’ knowledge.

PRISM scandal: tech giants flatly deny allowing NSA direct access to servers | World news | guardian.co.uk

What if the sites you love were turned against you?  CISPA turns sites into government spies.  Protest to stop it!

What if the sites you love were turned against you? CISPA turns sites into government spies. Protest to stop it!

truth-has-a-liberal-bias:


IN CASE YOU MISSED IT: CONGRESS TAKES YOUR INTERNET PRIVACY

To the disappointent of advocates for civil liberties and internet freedom, the controversial Cyber Intelligence and Protection Act (CISPA) passed the…
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Oh yeah, I caught it after it was too late:
your vote for #CISPA was disgraceful, @repjuanvargas goo.gl/S05sF because of tab.bz/lzrqx #civilliberties #ChulaVista— Ken (@diegueno) April 20, 2013
That’s the rub about Vargas: he’s a massive sellout, but at least he’s not a Republican, right?

truth-has-a-liberal-bias:

To the disappointent of advocates for civil liberties and internet freedom, the controversial Cyber Intelligence and Protection Act (CISPA) passed the…

Oh yeah, I caught it after it was too late:

That’s the rub about Vargas: he’s a massive sellout, but at least he’s not a Republican, right?

But what would happen in a regulation-free vacuum — essentially the wild west of the communications world — if the nation’s largest telecom company is allowed to operate with impunity? So far, public officials are not asking that question because they’re too busy praising AT&T’s announcements of billions of dollars of investment in new wireless broadband networks, supported with funds from President Barack Obama’s National Broadband Plan.


Because IP networks are regulated differently, they are not subject to rules that encourage universal access by making low-cost options available in under-served communities. The FCC also does not yet have rules for what reasonable exchange costs are with Internet-based communications.


Rules governing the networks that make landlines work prevent AT&T from telling smaller companies that connection exchange rates will suddenly double or triple for calls coming onto AT&T’s network. Without such regulation, AT&T could run an abusive monopoly with these exchange charges, leaving smaller carriers with no choice but to pay up and pass costs onto consumers. This means AT&T’s plan has the potential to drive up prices and drive down competition.

Since when is the FBI available (for anyone with the right social connections) as a private troll-uncloaking cyber police force?

Do you have any idea how hard it is to get the FBI to take action on an actual online death threat case, if the recipient isn’t a well-connected “honorary ambassador” in the military social elite? The short version: it simply does not happen. This whole story smells.

As former Wired News reporter Ryan Singel tweeted, “If the Broadwell/Petraeus case doesn’t show how ridiculous the FBI’s powers are, I don’t know what will prove it to you.”

3rd Party Twitter Apps may be Shut Down

Why bother with squeezing other developers out of the market when your search engine doesn’t work?

I say fixing twitter’s search engine to sort through all of the crap it carries would be a better use of it’s efforts.

The church has sent an email to followers instructing them on how “to counter free speech on the internet,” according to former Scientologist and current anti-Scientologist blogger Marty Rathbun, who posted the email message in its entirely on his blog.

The message instructs followers to visit media sites, including Microsoft, Google, or any other that requires users to agree to a code of conduct that prohibits comments that threaten, defame, or degrade any group or individuals.

South Carolina passes bill against municipal broadband

May Gawd forbid that South Carolinians get access to information that they don’t have to pay for.