Posts tagged law enforcement

Jurors should be fully aware when they are deliberating the fate of another human being that the only difference between who is sitting at the defendant’s table and the witness on the stand snitching on the defendant is who caved in first to pressure exerted by law enforcement and prosecutors. In many cases, the witness may have done something worse than the defendant, and was therefore more motivated to make a deal to squeal.

Take for example the case of Rich Paul, convicted primarily of marijuana-related offenses, thanks to government collusion with a snitch named Richie DuPont sent by an FBI agent to make illegal purchases from Paul in exchange for leniency for heroin offenses. And what was the FBI going after Rich Paul for? Were they interested in snaring him on marijuana charges? No, as Paul explained in a 2013 interview with FIJA, the FBI wanted drug charges to hang over his head in order to strong arm him into infiltrating a local community group and acting as a government snitch for political purposes….
While Colorado’s pot shops are embracing wax as a popular, potent form of newly legal cannabis, the Drug Enforcement Administration is whipping up a drug panic in California. In a Yahoo News article, Gary Hill, assistant special agent in charge at the DEA’s San Diego office warned, “We have seen people have an onset of psychosis and even brain damage from that exposure to that high concentration of THC. Our concern is that this is going to spread before we get it under control.”

Agent Hill offered no studies or data to back up these claims.

But the DEA, once again, is too late. BHO has been around for at least a decade and now it is more available than ever—and the wax is here to stay.

LAPD Officers Test On-Body Cameras - CBS Los Angeles

social-darwin-awards:

priceofliberty:

priceofliberty:

Police officers assigned to foot patrols of downtown Los Angeles began wearing on-body cameras on Wednesday as the city evaluates different models to include in its policing.

Police Commission President Steve Soboroff said 30 officers have volunteered for 90-day trials of devices provided by Arizona-based Taser International Inc. and Coban Technologies Inc. of Houston

We even have shitty 3D-printed guns.

Really? Did you ever learn about something like this in Rialto?

Maybe you didn’t get my flier to demand Border Patrol agents to do the same thing.

Sure, surveillance by law enforcement and governmental organizations is omnipresent. But let’s not fool ourselves that all applications of modern technology that we’d consider invasive is being implemented by law enforcement agencies alone: Consider what could be done when you walk in to a market or department store with your cellphone or when you carry around a security tag with an RFID chip in it; consider what tracking could be done by sundry agencies of law and commerce by looking at this post. Scrunitization of one’s use of technology without one’s consent is never ceases and is unavoidable — like it or not.

It might surprise you, but recording interactions with every contact a cop has might be a good thing that you’d want for cops to do to protect your rights.

holygoddamnshitballs:

And the arguments being heard reveal a lot of base prejudice. Several hundred people simply signed a canned statement claiming that the special session “rushes the legislative process,” a statement that ignores the fact that Hawaii has faced the question of same-sex marriage longer than any other state. Others have resorted to calling SB 1 “Stupid Bill No. 1.” One notable piece of testimony came from Tenari Maafala, the head of Hawaii’s police union. He told lawmakers, “You would have to kill me,” before he would consider enforcing a marriage equality law.

Watch Maafala answer questions from Rep. Bob McDermott (R), who is suing to prevent the legislature from passing the bill above.

As the epic hearing continues into day five, lawmakers will be subjected to more of these hackneyed talking points, but peppered throughout will be actual gay, lesbian, and bisexual people and their families. From students who started their high school’s gay-straight alliance to couples who’ve been together for years and just want to access federal benefits, the true importance of marriage equality will still be heard.

Tenari Ma’afala’s workplace is…
SHOPO Hawaii
1717 Hoe St.
Honolulu, Hawaii 96819
Tel# (808) 847-4676
Fax# (808) 841-4818 

After much anticipation from human rights advocates in the Southern Border Region, the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Inspector General (OIG) released a report yesterday entitled, “U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Use of Force Training and Actions to Address Use of Force Incidents.”

The revelation of eye-witness footage documenting the beating and killing of San Diego resident, Anastasio Hernandez Rojas, by over a dozen border agents prompted a national outcry from the public as well as 16 members of Congress for oversight and accountability over Customs and Border Protection for their use of force cases.  Since 2010, border guards have killed at least twenty people.

At the request of letters from 16 members of Congress, the Department of Homeland Security carried out a review of 2,000 records of alleged abuse (out of 21,000) that took place along the border between 2007 and 2012. They determined that nearly two-thirds (63%), or approximately 1,200 incidents, involved possible excessive use of force.

The Southern Border Communities Coalition (SBCC), a coalition of nearly 60 organizations from the southern border,  has been documenting stories of abuse and has been at the forefront of pressing for accountability and oversight over CBP over the past 3 years.  After reviewing the report, representatives of the SBCC issued these responses.

"This is an incomplete response to the question: Is Customs and Border Protection out of control?” said Andrea Guerrero, Executive Director of Alliance San Diego and co-chair of the SBCC. "While the report answers some questions, it doesn’t give us specifics on what steps are taken when agents are alleged to use excessive force and, given rash of incidents, what reforms or investigations are being undertaken. Where is the accountability and oversight of agents?"

"We need tracking of excessive use of force at the Department of Homeland Security and a formal process to evaluate and investigate force incidents." states Christian Ramírez, Director of the Southern Border Communities Coalition. "Without a clear mechanism to identify misconduct, investigate it, and hold agents accountable, the agency will continue to operate with impunity and endanger the lives of migrants and border residents and undermine our system of laws."

“If any metropolitan police department was involved in 19 fatal shootings in the span of two years, we would be appalled and would expect that that they would look at best practices from other agencies to reduce use-of-force incidents, like body-worn cameras for officers,” said Vicki B. Gaubeca, director of the ACLU of New Mexico’s Regional Center for Border Rights. “CBP, the nation’s largest law enforcement agency, should be doing the same, but there is little indication in this report that they are,” Gaubeca, co-chair of SBCC, continued.
Office of Inspector General’s Report on Border Patrol Use of Force is Incomplete and Insufficient
Report does not address accountability and further erodes trust.

Border 'surge' plan would be financial bonanza for private firms

The $46-billion security package in the immigration bill would benefit aerospace, technology and security companies, as well as border states.

Just like I thought, this is all about funding a new industry feeding at the teet of the government treasury, not about fixing a broken immigration system.

All of this protection will give Erich Honecker's corpse a hard on.

We request the California delegation to the United States Senate Amend S. 744 to mandate that all Border Patrol Agents in the field wear lapel cameras as stated in this press release.

There needs to be a reduction of excessive use of force by the Border Patrol, more protection of the public as well as agents, and it would be a clear form of accountability and oversight where none exists.
In the midst of recent national controversy surrounding government surveillance of the public, a recent Freedom of Information Act request to the Nebraska State Patrol has exposed evidence that TransCanada provided trainings to federal agents and local Nebraska police to suppress nonviolent activists protesting the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline by arresting them on “anti-terrorism statutes.” The presentation slides, obtained by grassroots landowner advocacy group Bold Nebraska, target Tar Sands Blockade activists by name.

“This is clear evidence of the collusion between TransCanada and the federal government assisting local police to unlawfully monitor and harass political protestors,” said Lauren Regan, legal coordinator for Tar Sands Blockade and executive director of the Civil Liberties Defense Center. “These documents expose the truth that the government is giving the nod to unlawful corporate spying. By slinging false allegations against peaceful activists in this presentation, TransCanada puts them at risk of unwarranted prosecution.”