Posts tagged sb 1070

Was Arizona’s “papers please” SB1070 law racially motivated and in violation of the Equal Protection Clause of the U.S. Constitution? A federal judge says the only way to find out is to look at the emails and letters exchanged between the Arizona GOP and groups such as ALEC that were advocating passage of the law.

The Arizona GOP is fighting to avoid disclosure even though, as Judge Susan Bolton pointed out, communications to public officials are public records under Arizona law. What do Republicans have to hide? Could it be that terms such as “illegals,” “wetbacks,” “undocumented,” and “Mexicans” were used in the correspondence, and would thus show a racial intent behind the law?
He said he had been cutting meat at a restaurant around the corner when he accidently sliced off a hunk of his flesh. More than 24 hours later, blood kept soaking through the toilet paper, and his finger still throbbed. This raised an obvious question: Why didn’t he go to the hospital?

"Because I don’t have papers," said the man, who would give only his first name, Ramon.

Ramon, 35, an undocumented immigrant from Hermosillo, Mexico, is just one example of how many of the estimated 400,000 illegal immigrants in Arizona have gone deeper underground to avoid contact with the authorities since Gov. Jan Brewer signed the toughest immigration law in the nation one year ago today.
This is what law enforcement is reduced to when they try to enforce asinine and unconstitutional laws.Cuéntame’s Photos - Wall Photos

This is what law enforcement is reduced to when they try to enforce asinine and unconstitutional laws.

NPR: Private Prisons behind Arizona's Immigration Law

This is one of the most shocking things I have heard on the radio in years. The story begins when a mysterious gentleman shows up in Benson, AZ to pitch a plan to the city manager.

What he was selling was a prison for women and children who were illegal immigrants.

“They talk [about] how positive this was going to be for the community,” Nichols said, “the amount of money that we would realize from each prisoner on a daily rate.”

But Nichols wasn’t buying. He asked them how would they possibly keep a prison full for years — decades even — with illegal immigrants?
Mad Props, Cincy!mightyflynn:

A ballpark just might be the most appropriate place in America to demand immigrant rights:

… By the 1870s baseball began to reflect the national culture in yet  another way. The game started to absorb the first group of outsiders who  would change baseball socially and culturally. The large influx of  Irish and Germans fleeing Europe’s economic and political troubles in  the 1840s quickly adopted baseball as a way of gaining acceptance in  their adopted homeland. By the early 1880s, 62 percent of the players in  the National League were of Irish or German descent.
… For the first, but not the last  time, outside groups used baseball to proclaim their American identity.  This process would continue through the modern history of baseball. In  the first decades of the 20th century the children of various ethnic  groups—Poles, Italians, Eastern European Jews, Czechs—used baseball to  demonstrate their status as 100 percent American and to overcome  anti-immigrant prejudice.
… After the integration of  baseball, Latin Americans began to enter the game in large numbers in  the 1950s and 1960s, producing such Hall of Famers as Juan Marichal,  Roberto Clemente, Orlando Cepeda and Tony Perez. Today, Latin America is  one of the largest single sources of talent for professional baseball.  The most common names of baseball players in the majors now are no  longer Williams, Jones, and Smith, but Rodriquez and Martinez. In recent  years Asia has joined Latin American as an important source of baseball  talent. No fewer than 21 Asian players were on major league rosters at  the beginning of the 2006 season.

- From “Food for Thought: Baseball and American History,” by John P. Rossi (Historical Society of Pennsylvania)
(AP Photo/Al Behrman FanFeedr)

Mad Props, Cincy!

mightyflynn:

A ballpark just might be the most appropriate place in America to demand immigrant rights:

… By the 1870s baseball began to reflect the national culture in yet another way. The game started to absorb the first group of outsiders who would change baseball socially and culturally. The large influx of Irish and Germans fleeing Europe’s economic and political troubles in the 1840s quickly adopted baseball as a way of gaining acceptance in their adopted homeland. By the early 1880s, 62 percent of the players in the National League were of Irish or German descent.

… For the first, but not the last time, outside groups used baseball to proclaim their American identity. This process would continue through the modern history of baseball. In the first decades of the 20th century the children of various ethnic groups—Poles, Italians, Eastern European Jews, Czechs—used baseball to demonstrate their status as 100 percent American and to overcome anti-immigrant prejudice.

… After the integration of baseball, Latin Americans began to enter the game in large numbers in the 1950s and 1960s, producing such Hall of Famers as Juan Marichal, Roberto Clemente, Orlando Cepeda and Tony Perez. Today, Latin America is one of the largest single sources of talent for professional baseball. The most common names of baseball players in the majors now are no longer Williams, Jones, and Smith, but Rodriquez and Martinez. In recent years Asia has joined Latin American as an important source of baseball talent. No fewer than 21 Asian players were on major league rosters at the beginning of the 2006 season.

- From “Food for Thought: Baseball and American History,” by John P. Rossi (Historical Society of Pennsylvania)

(AP Photo/Al Behrman FanFeedr)